1. Vitamin C - Can

  2. pickledelephant:

    Knife in the Water (1962) by Roman Polański

    Reblogged from: fieldguided
  3. We Are The Best! (2014) dir. Lukas Moodysson
Uh, this movie is THE BEST! There are happy Moodysson films, downer Moodysson films and experimental shitstorm Moodysson films. This fits nicely in the former, like Together and Fucking Amal. I had a huge grin on my face while watching this film. It’s great! It’s about girls, it’s punk and it’s about boys trying to ruin everything. 5 stars & 10 bags of popcorn. 

    We Are The Best! (2014) dir. Lukas Moodysson

    Uh, this movie is THE BEST! There are happy Moodysson films, downer Moodysson films and experimental shitstorm Moodysson films. This fits nicely in the former, like Together and Fucking Amal. I had a huge grin on my face while watching this film. It’s great! It’s about girls, it’s punk and it’s about boys trying to ruin everything. 5 stars & 10 bags of popcorn. 

  4. kateoplis:

The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years
“A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing what contemporary observers call a sufferfest. He set himself up for trouble: Scott brought Manchurian and Siberian ponies that quickly fell through the snow and ice; he planned, in part, for his crew to “man-haul,” meaning that the men would pull sleds full of gear, instead of relying on dogs. Even when Scott’s men faltered, they continued collecting specimens, including rocks. The expedition ended terribly; everybody who made the push to the pole died. Miserable, starving and frostbitten, one of Scott’s last four men killed himself by walking into a blizzard without even bothering to put on his boots.”
“But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent. Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected. Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone.”
Read on.

    kateoplis:

    The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years

    A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing what contemporary observers call a sufferfest. He set himself up for trouble: Scott brought Manchurian and Siberian ponies that quickly fell through the snow and ice; he planned, in part, for his crew to “man-haul,” meaning that the men would pull sleds full of gear, instead of relying on dogs. Even when Scott’s men faltered, they continued collecting specimens, including rocks. The expedition ended terribly; everybody who made the push to the pole died. Miserable, starving and frostbitten, one of Scott’s last four men killed himself by walking into a blizzard without even bothering to put on his boots.”

    But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent. Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected. Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone.”

    Read on.

    Reblogged from: kateoplis
  5. Mistaken for Strangers (2013)
An awkward, badly filmed, sorta funny film that is about two brothers more than it is about the band The National. The band seems boring, the film is mostly boring while trying to pass itself off as some kind of Spinal Tap. Meh.

    Mistaken for Strangers (2013)

    An awkward, badly filmed, sorta funny film that is about two brothers more than it is about the band The National. The band seems boring, the film is mostly boring while trying to pass itself off as some kind of Spinal Tap. Meh.

  6. Caught (1949) dir. Max Ophuls
A dark, noir-ish melodrama that cinematically soars with some amazing camera work and lighting while taking bites at gender and class. This film is filled with great performances and is most definitely worth a watch. 

    Caught (1949) dir. Max Ophuls

    A dark, noir-ish melodrama that cinematically soars with some amazing camera work and lighting while taking bites at gender and class. This film is filled with great performances and is most definitely worth a watch. 

  7. All About Eve (1950)
A sharp-tongued, superbly well-written character-driven film about ego, aging, and jealousy. Bette Davis is amazing here, as is the small Marilyn Monroe cameo and the always watchable Thelma Ritter. A fun, bumpy ride.

    All About Eve (1950)

    A sharp-tongued, superbly well-written character-driven film about ego, aging, and jealousy. Bette Davis is amazing here, as is the small Marilyn Monroe cameo and the always watchable Thelma Ritter. A fun, bumpy ride.

  8. Obvious Child (2014) dir. Gillian Robespierre
A sassy and funny little rom-com with cuteness and heart to spare. Jenny Slate is pretty great (as usual) and gets dumped, gets drunk, has a fling with a very cute boy, gets pregnant, has great parents, gets an abortion and gets on with her life. Refreshing. 

    Obvious Child (2014) dir. Gillian Robespierre

    A sassy and funny little rom-com with cuteness and heart to spare. Jenny Slate is pretty great (as usual) and gets dumped, gets drunk, has a fling with a very cute boy, gets pregnant, has great parents, gets an abortion and gets on with her life. Refreshing. 

  9. Blue Ruin (2013)
A low-budget revenge thriller that starts off truly interesting, as we follow a homeless dude living his life as an outsider on the Delaware shore, as he soon sets into motion his revenge for his parents death. The movie is filled with tension from start to finish, but the storyline gets muddled as it fills with a clumsily violent hillbilly family revenge feud and a strange fascination with guns. Still, interesting & nail-biting, if a little dumb by the end. 

    Blue Ruin (2013)

    A low-budget revenge thriller that starts off truly interesting, as we follow a homeless dude living his life as an outsider on the Delaware shore, as he soon sets into motion his revenge for his parents death. The movie is filled with tension from start to finish, but the storyline gets muddled as it fills with a clumsily violent hillbilly family revenge feud and a strange fascination with guns. Still, interesting & nail-biting, if a little dumb by the end. 

  10. d/l from here.

  11. Night Moves (2013) dir. Kelly Reichardt
Reichardt is probably my favourite working American film director and Night Moves is fantastic. If you’re thinking there’s a connection to the Gene Hackman movie from the ’70s, there is, in a sorta vague link. Like her other films, this one deals with outsiders in nature and this is one slow, thrilling burn. The characters are great - Jess Eisenberg plays the creep so well here that you hate him 10 minutes into the film.  I LOVED this. Highly recommended.

    Night Moves (2013) dir. Kelly Reichardt

    Reichardt is probably my favourite working American film director and Night Moves is fantastic. If you’re thinking there’s a connection to the Gene Hackman movie from the ’70s, there is, in a sorta vague link. Like her other films, this one deals with outsiders in nature and this is one slow, thrilling burn. The characters are great - Jess Eisenberg plays the creep so well here that you hate him 10 minutes into the film.  I LOVED this. Highly recommended.

  12. Brooklyn Castle (2012) dir. Katie Dellamaggiore
This documentary is one of those feel-good films with great kids, inspiring teachers and maybe a little life lesson or two. This chess team from Brooklyn, where 78% of the students are living under the poverty line, isn’t the underdog in the world of chess, they’re balls-out champions and it’s inspiring to see their hard work and devotion. It’s the outside forces - school board cuts brought on by corrupt Wall street players - that is the bad guy here and it’s infuriating that a quality public education for everyone isn’t protected. 

    Brooklyn Castle (2012) dir. Katie Dellamaggiore

    This documentary is one of those feel-good films with great kids, inspiring teachers and maybe a little life lesson or two. This chess team from Brooklyn, where 78% of the students are living under the poverty line, isn’t the underdog in the world of chess, they’re balls-out champions and it’s inspiring to see their hard work and devotion. It’s the outside forces - school board cuts brought on by corrupt Wall street players - that is the bad guy here and it’s infuriating that a quality public education for everyone isn’t protected. 

  13. Grid - Perfume Genius

  14. Seeing Nora Everywhere - The New Yorker

  15. etsy:

    We can’t get enough of archival gifs. 

    itscolossal:

    Artist Kevin Weir Creates Ghostly Animated GIFs Using Archival Photos from the Library of Congress [Sponsor]

    Reblogged from: etsy
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